History of The Wall Street Journal

History of The Wall Street
Journal Publisher of the Journal, Dow Jones & Company was founded in 1882 in a small basement office at 15 Wall Street in New York. One of the founder names Edward Jones then converted Customers’ Afternoon Letter into The Wall Street Journal which was first published in year 1889. Customers Afternoon Letter actually first published in year 1883 before conversion.

The Wall Street Journal was designed for the business community: Its object is to give fully and fairly the daily news attending the fluctuation in prices of stocks, bonds and some classes of commodities.

Changed hand in 1902 bought by Clarence Barron, circulation was around 7000 copies at that time increased to 50,000 copies by the end of 1920s.

The Wall Street Journal nevertheless fell on uncertain times in the 1990s, as declining advertising and rising newsprint costs—contributing to the first-ever annual loss at Dow Jones in 1997—raised speculation that the paper might have to drastically change, or be sold.

It was the largest-circulation newspaper in the United States until November 2003, when it was surpassed by USA Today. Its main rival as a daily financial newspaper is the London-based Financial Times, which also publishes several international editions.

May 2007, Rupert Murdoch made an offer to buy the Paper about 80% higher than market price. As of December 13, 2007, the Wall Street Journal is owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.
History of The Wall Street Journal
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